FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 20, 2021

Getty Launches Free Virtual Programs for July

Media Contact(s):

Cole Calhoun
ccalhoun@getty.edu
(714) 864-0768
Getty Communications

Getty Launches Free Virtual Programs for July

Discover a diverse range of educational and entertaining talks

Left: Study for Lunch on the Grass, 2020, Kyungmi Shin. Inkjet print. Courtesy of the Artist © Kyungmi Shin. Right: Tailings Pond 6, MineraCentinela Copper Mine, Antofagasta Region, Atacama Desert, Chile (detail) from the series Desolation Desert; Negative, 2018; print, 2020; David Maisel. Inkjet print. The J. Paul Getty Museum © David Maisel.

 

LOS ANGELES – Getty is hosting a lineup of free virtual programs to round out the month of July. From Mesopotamian beer making to confronting white narratives in art, discover a diverse range of educational and entertaining events. Visit www.getty.edu/whats-on for complete program information.

 

UPCOMING VIRTUAL LIVE PROGRAMS:

All virtual live events will be available either on Getty Museum’s YouTube or Getty Research Institute’s YouTube channels following the event.

 

Beyond the Frame: Pushing Boundaries of Photo-Based Work

Tuesday, July 20 at 5pm PT

Free, Hosted via Zoom

Register in advance for this online event

In this conversation, multidisciplinary artists Mercedes Dorame, Kori Newkirk, and Kyungmi Shin discuss how their approaches to art making and activism push the boundaries of photography, transforming it beyond its perceived objectivity and conventional format. Their work is featured in the exhibition Photo Flux: Unshuttering LA, which disrupts the privileging of white narratives in photography by celebrating the diverse, dynamic practices of contemporary Los Angeles artists.

 

Mesopotamia: Civilization Begins (with Beer)

Saturday, July 24 at 4pm PT

Free, Hosted via Zoom

Register in advance for this online event

Archaeologist Tate Paulette leads a journey to ancient Mesopotamia, one of the world’s first great beer cultures. By looking at archaeological remains, cuneiform documents, and works of art, Paulette explores the drinking and brewing of beer, and recent efforts to recreate ancient brews.

Tate Paulette is an assistant professor of history at North Carolina State University. He received his PhD in Mesopotamian archaeology from the University of Chicago. His research explores agricultural practices, the politics of food, and state-making in Mesopotamia and beyond. Paulette is currently co-directing an archaeological field project and field school at the site of Makounta-Voules-Mersinoudia in western Cyprus. He has spearheaded a collaborative effort to recreate Mesopotamian beer, and he is currently working on a book about beer and brewing in Mesopotamia.

 

Art Break: The Immersive Landscape

Wednesday, July 28 at 12pm PT

Free, Hosted via Zoom

Register in advance for this online event

How do contemporary photographers engage with the natural environment? Join British artist Susan Derges and San Francisco-based artist David Maisel as they discuss their approaches to photographing the landscape. Derges immerses herself in nature, capturing minute movements and elements through photograms made without a camera. In contrast, Maisel photographs from the sky to expose humans’ devastating impact on the environment. Despite their differing perspectives, both artists use beauty and abstraction to draw viewers into what they describe as the “immersive field,” a horizonless space that provokes disorientation and fosters reflection. Moderated by curator Virginia Heckert, this talk complements the exhibition The Expanded Landscape.

Susan Derges’ photographic work is in the collection of museums around the world including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Victoria and Albert Museum, London; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and The Hara Art Museum, Tokyo.

Virginia Heckert is a curator of photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum and organized the current exhibition The Expanded Landscape and the related exhibition Mario Giacomelli: Figure/Ground.

David Maisel works in photography and video. His work is in the collections of Berkeley Art Museum, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, among others.

 

Art Break: Where is the Person in the Portrait?

Friday, July 30 at 12pm PT

Free, Hosted via Zoom

Register in advance for this online event

The people depicted in ancient Roman portrait sculptures are often difficult to identify, and suggestions of possible identities can sometimes tell us more about the museums displaying them than the individuals depicted. Using photography, Los Angeles artist Ken Gonzales-Day has explored Roman portraits with an interest in interpretation, personhood, and the dynamics of stereotypes. Focusing on the marble bust of a young child, Gonzales-Day and antiquities curator Jens Daehner discuss the search for real people behind ancient portraits.

Jens Daehner has been a curator of ancient art at the Getty Museum since 2002. He organized several exhibitions exploring Hellenistic sculpture, the history of archaeology, and Roman imperial portraits, as well as the role of antiquity in 20th-century art. He is a widely published author and his book Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World (co-authored with Kenneth Lapatin) was awarded the London Hellenic Prize in 2015. Currently, he is preparing a collection catalog of Roman sculpture at the Getty, but also dedicates his time to mentorship, diversity and inclusion policies for the museum, and advocacy for the curatorial profession.

Ken Gonzales-Day’s interdisciplinary and conceptually grounded photographic projects consider the history of photography, the construction of race, and the limits of representational systems. Gonzales-Day has held fellowships at the Getty Research Institute, the Terra Foundation in Giverny, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, and the American Art Museum of the Smithsonian, among others. In 2017, Gonzales-Day received a Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography and currently holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Art at Scripps College. In 2018, he was the subject of a two-person exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Cole Calhoun

Getty Communications

ccalhoun@getty.edu

(714) 864-0768

 

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Getty is a leading global arts organization committed to the exhibition, conservation, and understanding of the world’s artistic and cultural heritage. Working collaboratively with partners around the globe, the Getty Foundation, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Museum and Getty Research Institute are all dedicated to the greater understanding of the relationships between the world’s many cultures. The Los Angeles-based J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs share art, knowledge, and resources online at Getty.edu and welcome the public for free at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa.

The J. Paul Getty Museum collects Greek and Roman antiquities, European paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculpture and decorative arts to 1900, as well as photographs from around the world to the present day. The Museum’s mission is to display and interpret its collections, and present important loan exhibitions and publications for the enjoyment and education of visitors locally and internationally. This is supported by an active program of research, conservation, and public programs that seek to deepen our knowledge of and connection to works of art.

The Getty Research Institute is an operating program of the J. Paul Getty Trust. It serves education in the broadest sense by increasing knowledge and understanding about art and its history through advanced research. The Research Institute provides intellectual leadership through its research, exhibition, and publication programs and provides service to a wide range of scholars worldwide through residencies, fellowships, online resources, and a Research Library. The Research Library—housed in the 201,000-square-foot Research Institute building designed by Richard Meier—is one of the largest art and architecture libraries in the world. The general library collections (secondary sources) include almost 900,000 volumes of books, periodicals, and auction catalogues encompassing the history of Western art and related fields in the humanities. The Research Library’s special collections include rare books, artists’ journals, sketchbooks, architectural drawings and models, photographs, and archival materials.

 

 

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